Posts Tagged ‘Web’

Expression 2 is out

Friday, May 2nd, 2008

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Microsoft released the Expression 2.0  suite of products today.  I’ve been using expression since last year and religiously updating whenever a new beta or preview version of any of the applications as they were released.  At first I wasn’t a big fan of the tools, therapist but over time I’ve really come to enjoy them and they have become my default tools to use for web and Silverlight development.  Combined with Visual Studio 2008 it all becomes a powerful environment.   Now that I’m learning how to develop and design in WPF I’m using Blend all the time to put together my UI objects.

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Windows Live Agent

Thursday, May 1st, 2008

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Twistori is so very pretty and simple.  I’m in love with the concept.  you really have to just go play with it.  Oh, approved and works amazingly well on the iPhone too. 

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Twistori is so very pretty and simple.  I’m in love with the concept.  you really have to just go play with it.  Oh, approved and works amazingly well on the iPhone too. 

image

Twistori is so very pretty and simple.  I’m in love with the concept.  you really have to just go play with it.  Oh, approved and works amazingly well on the iPhone too. 

agents logoI just stumbled upon the Windows Live Agent.  I’m not sure how I missed this before.  Their blog is full of some very interesting stuff.  Check out the BuddyScript Subpatterns entry. 

Here’s what Microsoft has to say about their agents:

Windows Live Agents are always-on conversational characters that engage Windows Live Messenger users while providing information, ampoule completing tasks on your behalf, gastritis and entertaining your customers.

I want to write an agent that will play me when I’m away from my IM.  It would have some nice simple messages to auto respond with

  • “I see”
  • “Hello, yes that is interesting.”
  • “Oh, I saw that last week”
  • “Mmmmm…  this sandwich is delicious.  Too bad I can’t share with you.”

Twistori is lovely

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008

image

Twistori is so very pretty and simple.  I’m in love with the concept.  you really have to just go play with it.  Oh, approved and works amazingly well on the iPhone too. 

Infinite Live Mesh Remote Desktop

Monday, April 28th, 2008

It just goes on forever

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Of course it’s the first thing that comes to mind when I see that I can remote back in to my machine from a remote connection

Microsoft Live Mesh Part 3

Sunday, April 27th, 2008

I had a chance to see Ori Amiga give a presentation around the Live Mesh platform at the Web 2.0 Expo.  At first I was little hesitant about this technology.  After all the public preview is super early and lacking in a whole lot of usefulness and features.  Getting a chance to really see where it’s going however got me all excited.

You can view the same presentation on Channel 9 – Programming the Mesh.

What’s missing from the current preview is the entire Apps section that is a major part of the product.

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Microsoft Live Mesh Web 2.0 Keynote presentation

Sunday, April 27th, 2008

Mobile post sent by futileboy using Utterz Replies.  mp3

Mobile post sent by futileboy using Utterz Replies.  mp3

Mobile post sent by futileboy using Utterz Replies.  mp3

Here’s the Live Mesh Keynote presentation from the Web 2.0 Expo.

Microsoft Live Mesh part 2

Thursday, April 24th, 2008

Okay after a little bit of dorking around and a reboot I was able to get my laptop added as a device on my Mesh

:: sounds of trumpets::

And…

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Well it’s not all that exciting just yet.  You see, viagra if I had more then one computer in my mesh then I would be cooking, but right now I can’t do much.

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Microsoft Live Mesh

Thursday, April 24th, 2008

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I just got my beta access to the Live Mesh services.  This is the first page you get as a new user.  I’m going to start playing around with it today to see how it can be used and how it can be pushed to its limits.  At first I was a little doubtful about this service.  It seems a little like Groove or .Mac. 

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Yahoo! Search Monkey Dev Beta

Thursday, April 24th, 2008

imageYou can sign up now for the SearchMonkey Developer Preview now.

As Ari Balogh, clinic this site Yahoo!’s new CTO, side effects will discuss in his Web 2.0 Expo keynote this morning, we’re rolling out a limited preview of the SearchMonkey Developer Tool starting today. With this online tool, developers can build data services that can be used to present richer, more useful search results. These data services can be constructed using structured data either from the Yahoo! Search index or from publicly available sources (such as APIs).

You can find more on the Yahoo! Search blog.

Silverlight 2.0 Twitter Widget

Wednesday, April 16th, 2008

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

I’m on an RSS widget roll.  I put together a widget that is much like the Flickr widget only it uses Twitter as the source.  Now Twitter had to go and give me a hard time by recently changing their cross domain policy file to only allow specific sites. Because of this I had to add a proxy to this solution to get it to work. 

Let’s get to the code.  If you need an aspx proxy this should do the trick for you.

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