David Kelley Demos the Touch Tag

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, medical
capsule touch tags and their projects in the retail space

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, medical
capsule touch tags and their projects in the retail space

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, medical
capsule touch tags and their projects in the retail space

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, medical
capsule touch tags and their projects in the retail space

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, cough
touch tags and their projects in the retail space

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

Recently, website
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, medical
capsule touch tags and their projects in the retail space

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, cough
touch tags and their projects in the retail space

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, otolaryngologist shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, infertility I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!
There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, cough
touch tags and their projects in the retail space

There’s been a lot of talk lately about multitouch interfaces.  There have been a bunch of tasty bites of information coming out of Microsoft about Windows 7.  Combine that with the user experience of the iPhone and OS X and I’m starting to see a trend emerge.

If you take a close look at Seadragon or DeepZoom, shop you’ll see a very powerful metaphor and technology that may be able to solve a problem that has perplexed UI / UX people from the beginning.    How can I make my users experience the same but more functional from one platform to another?  Many hours and a whole lot of money is spent every time a new piece of hardware comes out to create the user interface.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a design language that worked under ever situation from the very small screen to the largest.

When it comes to displaying an image on a screen often designers will have to spend time optimizing the images for the available resolution.  Technology like Seadragon actually takes care of this for you on the fly.  It looks at how many pixels it has to work with and displays the best quality image it can from the source.  This is fantastic and just starts to scratch the surface of why this is important.

The Exploring Interface

I’m going to go off on a little side track here for a moment.  While I was working at a certain start-up that was making a game console, I spent a lot of time thinking about the 3D user interface.  The concept was based on a real-time 3D game engine that was powering our UI.  It was DirectX based and offered us a ton of sophisticated capabilities.  One of which was distance texture maps.    We had high resolution texture maps being used for the box art of the retail games.  We had either scanned in or used supplied source images to then wrap a simple 3D polygon box.  The box could then be displayed all over the place at different angles or even rotated.  The 3D engine didn’t slow down or choke on the high res texture maps because the engine support multiple textures to be loaded based on how close it was to the camera.  As this new realm was explored we kept coming back to a simple but new way to show the information to the user.

I was calling this the “Explore” mode since it allowed a user to just start clicking away on objects that were adjacent to the primary information.   For example let’s say a specific game box was being shown front and center.  Surrounding the box would be other visual pieces of information.

  • Game publisher
  • Rating
  • small cluster of popular titles’ boxes that are similar to the current selection.
  • Reviews
  • Screen shots
  • etc

The user could click on one of the peripheral objects to bring it in to focus.

image

Once the new item takes focus the peripheral options will adapt dynamically based on the user behavior and content.

Let’s say for example out user selects the screen shots then it would shift to the center focus and the related information would  move and shift as well.

image

So take the above concept and add mutlitouch’s natural interface of zooming in and out.

if the user was to zoom out then they could get a high level view of their exploration

image

A dynamic map is created.  This map can help a user always find their place in the rich amount of information being displayed to them.

The same could be true for zooming in while exploring information.  Which would extend the panning and expanding metaphor with even richer levels of information.

image

In the above example my focus is on the product image control.  If I was to zoom in by pulling the image wider or double clicking then the product image control could expand to take over the screen real estate.

image

On the Desktop

I think the same behavior could exist as my OS.  I like the idea of moving the actual OS desktop to be more social and data in nature.  One that grows dynamical based on what I’m doing.

I think the biggest strength to this concept is that it could work well under any screen size.  Since the experience is scalable the user has the choice of how much information they want on the screen at any given time by zooming in our out.

I will plan on exploring this more in future postings so stay tuned!

Recently, Syphilis
I’ve been working on some Windows Multitouch applications.  These apps have been built using WPF and .Net 3.5 using Microsoft’s Touch Interop Library.  Since .Net 4.0 isn’t officially released yet, I haven’t been using it for any production apps, even though it would be the preferred choice for Windows Multitouch.

One of the bigger challenges with trying to design and create applications that take advantage of Windows 7’s native multitouch support is the hardware.  There is currently a fairly limited choice of external displays that you can add to your setup to begin working with.  All of the displays work the same in that they connect to your computer via a standard display port (VGA, DVI, HDMI, etc) and then also connect via USB to supply the touch device.

3M has two option currently in the works.

3M Display M2256PW

The 22 inch M2256PW which is currently slated to be released sometime in April, or the 19 inch C1968PW, which may or may no longer be available any longer.  I have one on my desk, but can’t find anything on the 3M site at this time. This is my favorite display since it support up to 10 touch points and is the most responsive of all the displays.  The glass screen is pretty reflective, but can be corrected with an antiglare coating.  The other down side, is price the developer kit for the 19” is $1499.

So aside from the 3M display being expense and impossible to buy it would be my pick.  However, because of those challenges I’d like to mention a few other great options.

The next display I’d like to talk about is the 21.5 inch HP Compaq L2105tm

c01879643

At $299.00 this is the best priced option available for multitouch.  It only supports two touch points and uses optical sensors in front of the glass.  This is the same technology that’s in the HP TouchSmart all in one systems.  The optical sensors can act a little wonky every now and then.  For example when rotating an image if your fingers cross the pass the beam then it can get confused with which finger is which.  Same is true if you put more then two fingers on the screen.  The HP supports VGA and DVI-D inputs.

The next display that I’ve found is the 21.5 inch Dell SX2210T 

image

At $349.00 is a little bit more expensive then the HP, but it offers a few more features.  Unlike the HP, the Dell support HDMI along with the DVI-D and VGA.  It also has built in speakers, Microphone, Webcam and USB port hub.  From a value standpoint and as a replacement to an existing monitor I think the dell is a much better value.  The multitouch technology is the same optical sensor as in the HP.

Next up is the 23 inch Acer T230H

T230H-04

I haven’t had a chance to use this display yet, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s the largest available.  I found it for sale via Amazon for $378.00. No built in webcam or audio but it does support input from Analog (VGA), Digital (HDMI + DVI with HDCP).

So you’ve looked at all these options and you’re saying Ryan, I need something much bigger.  Well then there is an option for you.  Planer makes custom displays to order for your needs.  Go and check out their touchscreen technology option and have them build the display of your dreams.

Last but not least is a special shout out to Mimo monitors.  Their displays are not yet multitouch, but they are a true Windows touch based device and not a mouse input as many inferior products are.  If you just need to play around with single touch interface design then you can get one of their iMo Pivot Touch displays for only $179.99

There are also many great laptop and tablet PC option out there, but that’s another post.

David J Kelley on Windows 7 Touch and Wirestone from Interact on Vimeo.

Our own David Kelley talking on camera at the MVP summit about Windows 7 touch technologies, cough
touch tags and their projects in the retail space

See David Kelley of Wirestone demonstrate his prototype for building immersive retail experiences. As a customer approaches a product, medications
the price tag, no rx
display and even the placement wall can all come alive with this integrated application. This was built using the Arduino Ping prototype mentioned in my previous post WPF Sonar application using Arduino and PING))) sensor

[ad#InlineAd]

Leave a Reply