Archive for April, 2008

Video of my iPhone getting laser etched

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2008


Video of my iPhone getting laser etched
Originally uploaded by futileboy

Here’s a short little video clip of the etching machine in action. I have to say CO2 lasers are super cool. I think I want one of these.


QR codes laser etched on my phone

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2008



CR codes laser etched on my phone

Originally uploaded by futileboy

My iPhone is all customized and pretty thanks to Instructables.com. They are offering free laser etching at the Web2.0 Expo if you bring a high contrast image on a thumb drive.

First person to decode my QR codes gets a cookie.


On my way to Web 2.0 Expo

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2008

Mobile post sent by futileboy using Utterz Replies.  mp3

Silverlight 2.0 Twitter Widget

Wednesday, April 16th, 2008

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

I’m on an RSS widget roll.  I put together a widget that is much like the Flickr widget only it uses Twitter as the source.  Now Twitter had to go and give me a hard time by recently changing their cross domain policy file to only allow specific sites. Because of this I had to add a proxy to this solution to get it to work. 

Let’s get to the code.  If you need an aspx proxy this should do the trick for you.

(more…)

links for 2008-04-13

Saturday, April 12th, 2008

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Stealing web site design

Friday, April 11th, 2008

Mark Wieman

So when is it okay to borrow someone’s html code and design?  I think there are times when it’s okay to take a snippet here and bit from there.  Most likely they found it someplace else too.  I guess I could be better at citing the sources when I do this, hospital but sometimes I’m bad about it.  Sorry.  I would never take a fully functional design, javascript function, CSS library, or anything that was fully completed by someone else with out giving them credit.

Recently my friend Mark Wieman’s business site design and code was lifted as is and used for the Celebrities Against Autism site. This was done without notifying him or crediting him for his work.

Mark’s a freelance interactive producer.  He makes a living creating web sites and designing user experiences.  Because of this there is a monetary value associated with his work.  So to me, taking the design and not paying isn’t all that different from stealing from him.

imageSo he went ahead and contacted them and told them it wasn’t cool.  As a result they changed the background color and added a Creative Commons Licenses where Mark’s old copywrite information used to be. I didn’t grab a screen shot of the first rev of the site, but I did grab one after they updated it with the fancy yellow background.

Putting the CC license on the site really takes the cake though.  First they take his work and then they licensed it for anyone else to use as well.  Well, that is nice of them. 

I know non-profits don’t have much in the way of money, but there are plenty of free templates out there for them to have used.  What I really wonder is, if the person who is taking credit for the site made any money at all for their work.  Even as an employee of the non-profit, it just doesn’t seem right to me.

Friday, April 11th, 2008

Mobile post sent by futileboy using Utterz Replies.  mp3

Silverlight 2.0 Flickr WordPress Widget

Tuesday, April 8th, 2008

I had the challenge of creating both a simple Silverlight 2.0 flickr viewer and a WordPress widget that used silverlight so I combined the two projects in to one.

The first part was creating the Silverlight 2.0 Flickr RSS viewer.

   1: <UserControl
   2:     xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/client/2007"
   3:     xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
   4:     x:Class="FlickrShow.Page"
   5:     Width="auto" 
   6:     Height="auto" 
   7:     x:Name="FlickrShow" 
   8:     xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
   9:     xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"   
  10:     mc:Ignorable="d">
  11:  
  12:     <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="#FF424242" >
  13:         <Image HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" Margin="0,0,0,0" x:Name="ImageItem" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" Stretch="Uniform" Cursor="Hand" Source="OpeningImage.jpg">
  14:             <Image.Resources>
  15:                 <Storyboard x:Name="FadeOutAnimation">
  16:                     <DoubleAnimation Duration="00:00:00.20" From="1" To="0"                        
  17:                                      Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"                        
  18:                                      Storyboard.TargetName="BigImage" />
  19:                 </Storyboard>
  20:                 <Storyboard x:Name="FadeInAnimation">
  21:                     <DoubleAnimation Duration="00:00:00.20" From="0" To="1"                        
  22:                                      Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"                        
  23:                                      Storyboard.TargetName="BigImage" />
  24:                 </Storyboard>
  25:             </Image.Resources>
  26:         </Image>
  27:         <TextBox Height="30" VerticalAlignment="Bottom" Text="" x:Name="LabelBox" Background="#2B000000" Foreground="#FFFFFFFF" BorderThickness="0,0,0,0" FontSize="11" />
  28:     </Grid>
  29: </UserControl>

page.xaml

   1: using System;
   2: using System.Collections.Generic;
   3: using System.Linq;
   4: using System.Windows;
   5: using System.Windows.Controls;
   6: using System.Windows.Documents;
   7: using System.Windows.Input;
   8: using System.Windows.Media;
   9: using System.Windows.Media.Animation;
  10: using System.Windows.Shapes;
  11: using System.Windows.Threading;
  12: using System.Windows.Browser;
  13: using System.Xml.Linq;
  14: using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
  15: using System.Windows.Resources;
  16: using System.IO;
  17: using System.Net;
  18: using System.Xml;
  19: using System.ServiceModel.Syndication;
  20:  
  21:  
  22:  
  23: namespace FlickrShow
  24: {
  25:     public class SettingDefinition
  26:     {
  27:         public string userID { get; set; }
  28:         public string feedType  { get; set; }
  29:         public string tags  { get; set; }
  30:         public string duration { get; set; }
  31:     }
  32:  
  33:     public partial class Page : UserControl
  34:     {
  35:         string currentUserID;
  36:         string currentFeedType;
  37:         string currentTags;
  38:         int currentDuration;
  39:  
  40:         DateTime lastUpdate;
  41:         string currentLink;
  42:         String[,] imgArray = new String[20, 3]; //Array to store information pulled from the RSS
  43:         int i = 0;  //handy little index number to count with
  44:         int imageIndex = 0;  //another index used for displaying specific images
  45:         DispatcherTimer dt = new DispatcherTimer();
  46:         
  47:         public Page(string UserID, string FeedType, string Tags, int Duration)
  48:         {
  49:             InitializeComponent();
  50:  
  51:             currentUserID = UserID;
  52:             currentFeedType = GetFeedType(FeedType);
  53:             currentTags = Tags;
  54:             currentDuration = Duration;
  55:  
  56:             this.Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(Page_Loaded);
  57:             HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)HttpWebRequest.Create(new Uri("http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/" + currentFeedType + currentUserID + currentTags + "&format=rss2"));
  58:  
  59:             request.BeginGetResponse(new AsyncCallback(getImages), request);
  60:  
  61:             lastUpdate = DateTime.Now;
  62:  
  63:             dt.Interval = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, currentDuration);
  64:             dt.Tick += new EventHandler(dt_Tick);
  65:             dt.Start();
  66:  
  67:         }
  68:  
  69:         void getImages(IAsyncResult asyncResult)
  70:         {
  71:             XNamespace mediaNamespace = "http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/";
  72:  
  73:  
  74:             HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)asyncResult.AsyncState;
  75:             HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.EndGetResponse(asyncResult);
  76:  
  77:             XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(response.GetResponseStream());
  78:             SyndicationFeed feed = SyndicationFeed.Load(reader);
  79:  
  80:             foreach (SyndicationItem item in feed.Items)
  81:             {
  82:                 //let's put the results in a multidimesional Array, because they are fun 
  83:                 imgArray.SetValue(item.ElementExtensions[1].GetReader().GetAttribute("url"), i, 0);
  84:                 imgArray.SetValue(item.Title.Text, i, 1);
  85:                 imgArray.SetValue("http://www.flickr.com" + item.Links[0].Uri.AbsolutePath, i, 2);
  86:                 i++;
  87:             }
  88:         }
  89:  
  90:         void Page_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
  91:         {
  92:                       
  93:             ImageItem.MouseEnter += new MouseEventHandler(ImageItem_MouseEnter);
  94:             ImageItem.MouseLeave += new MouseEventHandler(ImageItem_MouseLeave);
  95:             ImageItem.MouseLeftButtonDown += new MouseButtonEventHandler(ImageItem_MouseButtonDown);
  96:  
  97:             
  98:         }
  99:  
 100:  
 101:  
 102:         void dt_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
 103:         {
 104:             //this is our timer control, every time we update this will run
 105:             Update();   
 106:         }
 107:  
 108:         void Update()
 109:         {
 110:             //Updating the time
 111:             DateTime now = DateTime.Now;
 112:             TimeSpan elapsed = now - lastUpdate;
 113:             lastUpdate = now;
 114:             //do your loop processing here
 115:             ChangeImage();
 116:             
 117:         }
 118:  
 119:         void ChangeImage()
 120:         {
 121:             //This is where we actually update the <image> XAML. 
 122:  
 123:             if (imageIndex <= (i - 1))
 124:             {
 125:                 LabelBox.Text = imgArray.GetValue(imageIndex, 1) as string;
 126:                 ImageItem.SetValue(Image.SourceProperty, imgArray.GetValue(imageIndex, 0) as string);
 127:                 currentLink = imgArray.GetValue(imageIndex, 2) as string;
 128:                 imageIndex++;
 129:             }
 130:             else
 131:             {
 132:                 imageIndex = 0;
 133:                 LabelBox.Text = imgArray.GetValue(imageIndex, 1) as string;
 134:                 ImageItem.SetValue(Image.SourceProperty, imgArray.GetValue(imageIndex, 0) as string);
 135:                 currentLink = imgArray.GetValue(imageIndex, 2) as string;
 136:                 imageIndex++;
 137:             }
 138:  
 139:         }
 140:  
 141:         public string GetFeedType(string feedSetting)
 142:         {
 143:             switch (feedSetting)
 144:                 {
 145:                 case "Public":
 146:                         return "photos_public.gne?id=";                        
 147:                 case "Friends":
 148:                     //This is for a future release
 149:                         return "photos_friends.gne?user_id=";
 150:                 default:
 151:                         return "photos_public.gne?id="; 
 152:                 }
 153:             
 154:         }
 155:  
 156:         public string FormatTags(string tagsElement)
 157:         {
 158:             if (tagsElement.Length > 0)
 159:             {
 160:                 return "&tags=" + tagsElement;
 161:             }
 162:             else { return ""; }
 163:         }
 164:  
 165:         private void ImageItem_MouseEnter(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
 166:         {            
 167:                 dt.Stop();
 168:         }
 169:  
 170:         private void ImageItem_MouseLeave(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
 171:         {
 172:             dt.Start();
 173:         }
 174:  
 175:         private void ImageItem_MouseButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
 176:         {
 177:             HtmlPage.Window.Navigate(new Uri(currentLink, UriKind.Absolute), "_flickr");
 178:         }
 179:     }
 180: }

page.xaml.cs

   1: using System.Windows;
   2: using System;
   3:  
   4: namespace FlickrShow
   5: {
   6:     public partial class App : Application 
   7:     {
   8:  
   9:         public App() 
  10:         {
  11:             this.Startup += this.OnStartup;
  12:             this.Exit += this.OnExit;
  13:  
  14:             InitializeComponent();
  15:         }
  16:  
  17:         private void OnStartup(object sender, StartupEventArgs e) 
  18:         {
  19:             // Load the main control here
  20:             string currentUserID = e.InitParams["flickr_userID"];
  21:             string currentFeedType = "Public";
  22:             string currentTags = "";
  23:             int currentDuration = Convert.ToInt32(e.InitParams["time"]);
  24:  
  25:             this.RootVisual = new Page(currentUserID, currentFeedType, currentTags, currentDuration);
  26:         }
  27:  
  28:         private void OnExit(object sender, EventArgs e) 
  29:         {
  30:  
  31:         }
  32:     }
  33: }

App.xaml.cs

   1: <?php
   2: /*
   3: Plugin Name: Silverlight Flickr Widget
   4: Plugin URI: http://www.futile.com/
   5: Description: A widget which will display your latest Flickr photos using Silverlight.
   6: Author: Ryan T. Lane
   7: Version: 0.2
   8: Author URI: http://futile.com/
   9: 
  10: Installing
  11: 1. Make sure you have the Widget plugin available at http://automattic.com/code/widgets/
  12: 1. Copy wordpressWidgetSilverlightFlickr.php to your plugins folder, /wp-content/plugins/widgets/
  13: 2. Activate it through the plugin management screen.
  14: 3. Go to Themes->Sidebar Widgets and drag and drop the widget to wherever you want to show it.
  15: 
  16: Changelog
  17: 0.2 = First public release.
  18: */
  19:  
  20:  
  21: function WidgetFlickrSilverlight($args) {
  22:     extract($args);
  23:     
  24:     $options = get_option('WidgetFlickrSilverlight');
  25:     if( $options == false ) {
  26:         $options[ 'flickr_userID' ] = '21854617@N00';
  27:         $options[ 'time' ] = 4;
  28:     }
  29:     
  30:     $time = $options[ 'time' ];
  31:     $flickr_userID = $options[ 'flickr_userID' ];
  32:     
  33:     echo $before_widget;
  34:     
  35:     echo $before_title . 'Flickr' . $after_title; 
  36:     ?>
  37:                <script type="text/javascript">
  38:                     function onSilverlightError(sender, args) {
  39:                     if (args.errorType == "InitializeError")  {
  40:                         var errorDiv = document.getElementById("errorLocation");
  41:                         if (errorDiv != null)
  42:                         errorDiv.innerHTML = args.errorType + "- " + args.errorMessage;
  43:                         }
  44:                     }
  45:                 </script>
  46:                 
  47:                 <!-- Runtime errors from Silverlight will be displayed here.
  48:                     This will contain debugging information and should be removed or hidden when debugging is completed -->
  49:                 <div id='errorLocation' style="font-size: small;color: Gray;"></div>
  50:  
  51:                 <div id="silverlightControlHost">
  52:                     <object data="data:application/x-silverlight," type="application/x-silverlight-2-b1" width="100%" height="100%">
  53:                         <param name="source" value="/wp-content/plugins/widgets/FlickrShow.xap"/>
  54:                         <param name="onerror" value="onSilverlightError" />
  55:                         <param name="background" value="white" />
  56:                         <param name="initParams" value="time=<?php echo $time; ?>,flickr_userID=<?php echo $flickr_userID; ?>" />
  57:                         
  58:                         <a href="http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=108182" style="text-decoration: none;">
  59:                              <img src="http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=108181" alt="Get Microsoft Silverlight" style="border-style: none"/>
  60:                         </a>
  61:                     </object>
  62:                     <iframe style='visibility:hidden;height:0;width:0;border:0px'></iframe>
  63:                 </div>   
  64:         <?php echo $after_widget; ?>
  65: <?php
  66: }
  67:  
  68: function WidgetFlickrSilverlight_control() {
  69:     $options = $newoptions = get_option('WidgetFlickrSilverlight');
  70:     if( $options == false ) {
  71:         $newoptions[ 'title' ] = 'Flickr Photos';
  72:     }
  73:     if ( $_POST["flickr-submit"] ) {
  74:         $newoptions['title'] = strip_tags(stripslashes($_POST["flickr-title"]));
  75:         $newoptions['time'] = strip_tags(stripslashes($_POST["time"]));
  76:         $newoptions['flickr_userID'] = strip_tags(stripslashes($_POST["flickr-userID"]));
  77:     }
  78:     if ( $options != $newoptions ) {
  79:         $options = $newoptions;
  80:         update_option('WidgetFlickrSilverlight', $options);
  81:     }
  82:     $title = wp_specialchars($options['title']);
  83:     $time = wp_specialchars($options['time']);
  84:     if ( empty($items) || $items < 1 ) $items = 3;
  85:     $flickr_userID = wp_specialchars($options['flickr_userID']);
  86:  
  87: ?>
  88:     <p><label for="flickr-title"><?php _e('Title:'); ?> <input style="width: 250px;" id="flickr-title" name="flickr-title" type="text" value="<?php echo $title; ?>" /></label></p>
  89:     <p><label for="flickr-userID"><?php _e('Flickr User ID:'); ?> <input style="width: 250px;" id="flickr-title" name="flickr-userID" type="text" value="<?php echo $flickr_userID; ?>" /></label></p>
  90:     <p style="text-align:center; line-height: 30px;"><?php _e('Time per image in seconds:'); ?> <select id="time" name="time"><?php for ( $i = 1; $i <= 10; ++$i ) echo "<option value='$i' ".($time==$i ? "selected='selected'" : '').">$i</option>"; ?></select></p>
  91:     <p align='left'>
  92:     * Your user ID can be found on your Flickr RSS page. Scroll down to the bottom of the page until you see the <em>Feed</em> link and copy the value after id from the URL into the box above.<br />
  93:     <br clear='all'></p>
  94:     <input type="hidden" id="flickr-submit" name="flickr-submit" value="1" />
  95: <?php
  96: }
  97:  
  98:     function WidgetFlickrSilverlight_init() {
  99:         register_widget_control('Silverlight Flickr', 'WidgetFlickrSilverlight_control', 500, 250);
 100:         register_sidebar_widget('Silverlight Flickr', 'WidgetFlickrSilverlight');
 101:     }
 102:     add_action( "init", "WidgetFlickrSilverlight_init" );
 103:  
 104: ?>

wordpressWidgetSilverlightFlickr.php

 

The php page and compiled .xap files are placed in the /wp-content/plugins/widgets/ folder.

First you will have to activate the plug-in.

image

Then enable the widget in one of your sidebars and edit the properties to include your information.

image

if you don’t know your flickr user id you can get it from idGettr

That’s all for now.  I will do a more detailed write up of what is going on up above very soon.

You can grab the source from CodePlex.

Working, sharepoint and C#

Monday, April 7th, 2008

Mobile post sent by futileboy using Utterz Replies.  mp3

Evil IE formating bug

Friday, April 4th, 2008

I talk about the most annoying rendering bug I’ve found in IE. It made me so mad!


Mobile post sent by futileboy using Utterz Replies.  mp3